• Anonymouswhat is meant by the term "sucking chest wound"?
  • ermedicine

    Oh, this will be a fun question to answer.

    Okay, so:

    (Also someone please correct me if I’m wrong)

    To understand what a sucking chest wound is, we first sort of need to understand the concept of a pneumothorax, a “collapsed lung”. Basically, under normal circumstances, your lungs operate under what’s called a negative pressure system. This negative pressure system means that the pressure in the “lungs” is more negative than the outside environment, which allows the air we breathe to flow into our lungs as we inhale. As we inhale, our chest wall expands, allowing the lungs to expand and decrease the air pressure, allowing air to flow from high to low pressure.  Our lungs also have what’s called pleura, a membrane around each lung with two layers called the parietal pleura and visceral pleura. The parietal pleura is attached to the chest wall while the visceral pleura is attached to the lung itself. This membrane is very important in helping to establish the negative pressure system mentioned earlier. Importantly, the pleura have what’s called the pleural cavity, which  is a potential space. What this means is that under normal physiological conditions, there is no actual space between the pleura other than the small amount of pleural fluid between them. But there is the potential for their to be space under abnormal conditions.

    So, because the lungs operate under negative pressure, this means that air will flow from high pressure to low pressure under almost all circumstances. This is how pneumothoraces are created. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the pleural cavity, turning the potential space between the pleura into an actual space. This is usually due to trauma (gun shot wounds, stabbings, rib fractures) but can sometimes be due to things like COPD, cancer, and interstitial lung disease. The creation of the actual pleural space is bad because air will travel from the path of lease resistance, and oftentimes create a large pleural space when one shouldn’t exist. This now existing pleural space separates the lung from the chest wall, preventing it from being able to expand and placing pressure on the lung. This is why we use chest tubes to correct a pneumothorax. The tube is inserted into the pleural cavity, and connected to a vacuum pump to remove the air/fluid in the pleural cavity and restore the negative pressure environment and making a potential space rather than an actual space. 

    So, to answer your original question, a sucking chest wound is a very very serious type of traumatic pneumothorax. A sucking chest wound occurs when there is an open wound through the chest wall and into the pleural space, creating a one way route for air to enter the space. Air, like many other things, follows the path of least resistance. With every breath someone with an open pneumothorax takes, more air will enter the pleural space, making the situation worse. These sucking chest wounds get their name because you can sometimes literally hear a sucking sound coming from the wound as air enters into the chest wound during inspiration, and you will also see blood bubbling during inspiration and expiration.

    I hope this answers your question and wasn’t too long of an answer!

  • Scribe Kawaiii
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PCAT

ermedicine:

scribekawaii:

PCAT tomorrow guys!image



YOU CAN DO IT!!!!!!!

This is going to be you destroying the PCAT tomorrow!

GOOD LUCK!!!

I just finished the PCAT and feel so relieved and happy that it’s over!!! Thanks to everyone (especially ermedicine) who wished me luck!! Y’all are the best!!!! :D
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PCAT

PCAT tomorrow guys!



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cardonery:

strawwolf:

achipandachair:

sushinfood:

"Weird Al" Yankovic does it again with his newest parody "Word Crimes"

this is great.

I can finally enjoy this tune without Robin Thicke

Thank the gods for Weird Al

This was amazing.

And it was more amazing because Trogdor is in it.

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  • AnonymousSo I just started seeing a third year med student. We went on a few great dates before he began his rotations, but now he's working 10-12 hour days and it's getting harder to see him since we live 40 mins away and only I have a car. I'm applying to med school, so I'm a little more understanding than the average person would be. Any recommendations on making this a sustainable relationship?
  • aspiringdoctors

    Patience, communication, and forgiveness.

    Adjust your expectations. This is not going to be like a normal relationship, like the ones most of your friends have. Third year is bonkers.

    You will probably not get to see him every weekend, or every week even. You will probably not be able to text or email or facebook or snapchat or whatever the kids are doing these days all day. You will probably not be able to go to all the parties, holidays, etc together. You will probably (at first) have no idea what he’s talking about half the time.

    Right now, you will probably have to do a lot of the legwork (ie- going to see him, rather than completely evenly splitting up who goes to visit who) and be very independent. You will have to be very understanding a lot of the time. It’s going to be hard.

    And the guy isn’t off the hook either. I feel like the onus of communication is on him- he needs to make every effort to stay in touch with you. For example, a short ‘Hey, thinking about you, hope your day is going well. Today is nuts over here! I’m supposed to get out of clinic at 7pm, can I call you tonight?’ whenever he can is a good start.  He needs to let you know when he is free to talk or hang out and make room for you in his life- even if it’s just once a month or after shelf exams.

    This is a tricky time to start a relationship. It might feel like things are progressing agonizingly slow. Don’t get upset, please. Med students do not have much control over their schedules during third year, and lot of the time we feel incompetent, stupid, and in the way- don’t add to our bulging stress burrito.

    Again, be patient, communicate, and choose to forgive when things get rough.

    Good luck!!

  • Scribe Kawaiii
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